Is the Technology Industry Doing Enough for Humanity?

Nicholas Koiza - Head of Business Development, Security

By: Nick Koiza
Head of Security Business

10th July 2018

Home » Insights » Security

This Thursday, I am co-chairing the Cambridge Wireless event: “Drones: The Good, the bad and the scary” as part of my work as a Security SIG champion.

This has prompted me to think about our evolving technology industry; as we are successfully maturing, are we giving enough back? Do we have a duty to use our technical expertise and knowledge and apply them for the betterment of humanity?

Commercial drone manufacturers DJI Technology conducted a survey in early 2017 looking at the number of lives saved by drones. The report states that at least 59 people have been rescued from life-threatening conditions around the Globe.

The clear conclusion is that drones are regularly saving lives around the world. This is occurring even though professional rescue crews are just beginning to adopt UAS technology, and in many cases are relying on bystanders or volunteers to provide lifesaving assistance.”

Since then however, it is estimated that at least 133 people have been rescued. The numbers are rising, as the number of drones being utilised increases. In June this year, it was recorded that, globally, public safety drones saved four lives in one day alone – great news. The latest UK case was the rescue of a missing man who had become stuck in deep marshland in Norfolk. The man was stranded for 22 hours before being found by a police surveillance drone.

Life-changing technologies are being used but not in the life-changing sectors of Charity and Humanitarian Aid.

For years now companies, like Matternet, have been looking at drone and other technologies and how it can impact positively in the charity sector. It shouldn’t take much for engineering companies to assess their technology and work out how it can be applied for less profitable, but very worthy causes.

At Plextek we have a range of bespoke technology solutions that could be reapplied with some thought:

Last mile response: in a crisis, either environmental or war, drones can provide autonomous humanitarian aid into areas where it might be too dangerous for aid workers to enter.

Surveillance: For early identification/warning systems in environmental disaster areas. Or to enter the location of a disaster to assess the situation and safety for humans.

Identification: Possible human identification in the case of human trafficking, or animal ID and tracking for monitoring the numbers of endangered species.

First Response: First response units like lifeboats, mountain rescue or fire service can all use technology to enhance their search and rescue capabilities. The RNLI have already used drones to find people lost at sea but is the technology achievable at scale as the take up is slow across the board.

We need to make the latest engineering developments accessible for a wider range of applications. But what is the motivation to invest company time and money in applying technology to the charity/not-for-profit sector?

I guess the larger the company, the more shareholders there are to answer to. Ideally, the technology industry could pull together and work on a better future. It’s not going to be politicians. It’s up to us.

If you’d like to chat further, come and see me at the event, or get in touch, email: nicholas.koiza@plextek.com or call: +44 (0) 1799 533 266

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This Thursday, I am co-chairing the Cambridge Wireless event: “Drones: The Good, the bad and the scary” as part of my work as a Security SIG champion.

This has prompted me to think about our evolving technology industry; as we are successfully maturing, are we giving enough back? Do we have a duty to use our technical expertise and knowledge and apply them for the betterment of humanity?

Commercial drone manufacturers DJI Technology conducted a survey in early 2017 looking at the number of lives saved by drones. The report states that at least 59 people have been rescued from life-threatening conditions around the Globe.

The clear conclusion is that drones are regularly saving lives around the world. This is occurring even though professional rescue crews are just beginning to adopt UAS technology, and in many cases are relying on bystanders or volunteers to provide lifesaving assistance.”

Since then however, it is estimated that at least 133 people have been rescued. The numbers are rising, as the number of drones being utilised increases. In June this year, it was recorded that, globally, public safety drones saved four lives in one day alone – great news. The latest UK case was the rescue of a missing man who had become stuck in deep marshland in Norfolk. The man was stranded for 22 hours before being found by a police surveillance drone.

Life-changing technologies are being used but not in the life-changing sectors of Charity and Humanitarian Aid.

For years now companies, like Matternet, have been looking at drone and other technologies and how it can impact positively in the charity sector. It shouldn’t take much for engineering companies to assess their technology and work out how it can be applied for less profitable, but very worthy causes.

At Plextek we have a range of bespoke technology solutions that could be reapplied with some thought:

Last mile response: in a crisis, either environmental or war, drones can provide autonomous humanitarian aid into areas where it might be too dangerous for aid workers to enter.

Surveillance: For early identification/warning systems in environmental disaster areas. Or to enter the location of a disaster to assess the situation and safety for humans.

Identification: Possible human identification in the case of human trafficking, or animal ID and tracking for monitoring the numbers of endangered species.

First Response: First response units like lifeboats, mountain rescue or fire service can all use technology to enhance their search and rescue capabilities. The RNLI have already used drones to find people lost at sea but is the technology achievable at scale as the take up is slow across the board.

We need to make the latest engineering developments accessible for a wider range of applications. But what is the motivation to invest company time and money in applying technology to the charity/not-for-profit sector?

I guess the larger the company, the more shareholders there are to answer to. Ideally, the technology industry could pull together and work on a better future. It’s not going to be politicians. It’s up to us.

If you’d like to chat further, come and see me at the event, or get in touch, email: nicholas.koiza@plextek.com or call: +44 (0) 1799 533 266

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Further Reading

Developing a Strategy for Maximising User Benefits with Critical Mobile Broadband Solutions

Nicholas Koiza - Head of Business Development, Security

By: Nick Koiza
Head of Security Business

28th June 2018

Home » Insights » Security

I was pleased to speak at the recent Mission Critical Technologies event in London on ‘Developing a Strategy for Maximising User Benefits with Critical Mobile Broadband Solutions’. The key points from my presentation are outlined below:

Market Evolution

We’re entering a new era in critical communications with the market undergoing significant change. Mobile broadband is driving increased interest in data-centric approaches for fulfilling voice and data needs. The emergence of LTE-based solutions will facilitate high throughput applications.

There’s also scope to complement existing PMR solutions with LTE. Hybrid installations will benefit satisfied narrowband users desiring value-add from broadband data.

LTE also facilitates Push-to-Talk (PTT) voice replacement with equivalent data alternatives, i.e., for those users that want to totally replace their PMR systems or start from scratch with LTE.


New User Opportunities

There’s already a diversity of roles in the field within each user organisation, let alone across the many professional user markets currently enjoying PMR voice communications!

Exploiting mobile broadband will require a plethora of device options to be created, and users will need to be provisioned with dedicated applications that fully leverage high speed data services.

For the first time in the history of this market, transitioning to broadband promises high throughput applications. Users will benefit from increased safety, security and operational efficiency, as well as significant cost savings – all long-awaited!

In terms of developing a strategy for maximising user benefits, here are a few tips for you to consider:

Meet Operational Needs

In contrast to conventional voice solutions, data services place greater emphasis on understanding how end users will benefit from solutions that are right for meeting their operational needs.

Establishing mobile working practices across user groups requires a consultative approach that considers the wide spectrum of staff roles and associated use cases & operational processes, together with working environments (sometimes harsh), so that each user can benefit!

Tailor Devices & Applications to Meet User Needs

Only after establishing individual field workers roles will it be possible to design next generation products that meet key criteria such as device form factor, ruggedness, power management, wireless OS and application needs etc.

Creating your products on a custom basis provides greater flexibility and reassurance that user specific needs will be met – it’s all about giving your users the right tools for the job!

Innovate!

Exploit potential promised by mobile broadband for innovation, e.g., for in-vehicle environments, have you considered encapsulating the functionality of current multiple units within a single device to free up space?

You can also create innovative solutions exploiting hybrid technologies i.e. existing narrowband TETRA and deployable broadband LTE, so why not get the best of both worlds through an integrated approach?

Achieve Cost Effectiveness

There are ways to significantly reduce the cost of developing next generation products. You can also ensure that complete design and supply is achieved with greater cost-effectiveness than inflexible off-the-shelf-products!

Why not lower your BOM costs and accelerate time to market with readily available components such as standard LTE modules, particularly with 3GPP standardised releases?

You can manage the manufacturing supply chain to generate further savings without compromising manufacturing rigour.

Summary

Next generation devices and applications call for:

• A strong understanding of operational use cases
• Flexibility, so the needs of each individual field worker are met, regardless of working environment and operational functions
• Innovation, cost-effectiveness, component based solutions that adhere to 3GPP standards
• Giving your users the right tools for the job!


If you’ve got questions about critical communications, just give me a call. I’m always happy to chat and advise on your next steps. And hopefully, see you at the next Mission Critical Communications event!

Email: nicholas.koiza@plextek.com Tel: +44 (0) 1799 533 266

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I was pleased to speak at the recent Mission Critical Technologies event in London on ‘Developing a Strategy for Maximising User Benefits with Critical Mobile Broadband Solutions’. The key points from my presentation are outlined below:

Market Evolution

We’re entering a new era in critical communications with the market undergoing significant change. Mobile broadband is driving increased interest in data-centric approaches for fulfilling voice and data needs. The emergence of LTE-based solutions will facilitate high throughput applications.

There’s also scope to complement existing PMR solutions with LTE. Hybrid installations will benefit satisfied narrowband users desiring value-add from broadband data.

LTE also facilitates Push-to-Talk (PTT) voice replacement with equivalent data alternatives, i.e., for those users that want to totally replace their PMR systems or start from scratch with LTE.


New User Opportunities

There’s already a diversity of roles in the field within each user organisation, let alone across the many professional user markets currently enjoying PMR voice communications!

Exploiting mobile broadband will require a plethora of device options to be created, and users will need to be provisioned with dedicated applications that fully leverage high speed data services.

For the first time in the history of this market, transitioning to broadband promises high throughput applications. Users will benefit from increased safety, security and operational efficiency, as well as significant cost savings – all long-awaited!

In terms of developing a strategy for maximising user benefits, here are a few tips for you to consider:

Meet Operational Needs

In contrast to conventional voice solutions, data services place greater emphasis on understanding how end users will benefit from solutions that are right for meeting their operational needs.

Establishing mobile working practices across user groups requires a consultative approach that considers the wide spectrum of staff roles and associated use cases & operational processes, together with working environments (sometimes harsh), so that each user can benefit!

Tailor Devices & Applications to Meet User Needs

Only after establishing individual field workers roles will it be possible to design next generation products that meet key criteria such as device form factor, ruggedness, power management, wireless OS and application needs etc.

Creating your products on a custom basis provides greater flexibility and reassurance that user specific needs will be met – it’s all about giving your users the right tools for the job!

Innovate!

Exploit potential promised by mobile broadband for innovation, e.g., for in-vehicle environments, have you considered encapsulating the functionality of current multiple units within a single device to free up space?

You can also create innovative solutions exploiting hybrid technologies i.e. existing narrowband TETRA and deployable broadband LTE, so why not get the best of both worlds through an integrated approach?

Achieve Cost Effectiveness

There are ways to significantly reduce the cost of developing next generation products. You can also ensure that complete design and supply is achieved with greater cost-effectiveness than inflexible off-the-shelf-products!

Why not lower your BOM costs and accelerate time to market with readily available components such as standard LTE modules, particularly with 3GPP standardised releases?

You can manage the manufacturing supply chain to generate further savings without compromising manufacturing rigour.

Summary

Next generation devices and applications call for:

• A strong understanding of operational use cases
• Flexibility, so the needs of each individual field worker are met, regardless of working environment and operational functions
• Innovation, cost-effectiveness, component based solutions that adhere to 3GPP standards
• Giving your users the right tools for the job!


If you’ve got questions about critical communications, just give me a call. I’m always happy to chat and advise on your next steps. And hopefully, see you at the next Mission Critical Communications event!

Email: nicholas.koiza@plextek.com Tel: +44 (0) 1799 533 266

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Further Reading

Vlog: Plextek at Mission Critical Technologies 2018

Nicholas Koiza - Head of Business Development, Security

By: Nick Koiza
Head of Security Business

13th June 2018

Home » Insights » Security

We’re at Mission Critical Technologies on the 13-14th June 2018. Speaking at the event, Nick Koiza discusses the themes of our stand and his presentation titled, “Developing a strategy for maximising user benefits with critical mobile broadband solutions”. You can catch Nick delivering his talk on the second day of the exhibition (June 14th at 14:30).

Transcript

Hi, I’m Nick Koiza and I’d like to tell you about our plan for Plextek to exhibit at Mission Critical Technologies at the Excel in London on the 13-14th June so hopefully we’ll see you there.

Our plan for the show will be the secure critical communications market, a sector that’s currently transitioning from traditional PMR to embrace the latest in LTE technology. We’ve been addressing this market from several perspectives. Firstly, we’ve been focusing on our customer’s needs in developing next generation LTE devices to enable the users to benefit from broadband data. Secondly, we’ve been designing and supplying safe city IOT solutions, an area where many of our customers from across the globe have benefited from Plextek’s heritage in smart sensors as well as in communications.

Finally, our growth has been accelerated recently as a result of the work we have been doing on disruptive technologies for unmanned systems and automation. For example, we’ve been developing and integrating sensors for UAV platforms for detection and surveillance purposes. We see this area as being hugely significant to the public safety community, particularly with broadband data enabling the emergency services and counter-terrorism officers to gain rapid access to intelligence to enhance their decision-making.

So, we’ll be showcasing all of these areas on our stand, at Plextek stand number 210 and I’ll be speaking on the second day of the conference so we look forward to seeing you there.

We’re at Mission Critical Technologies on the 13-14th June 2018. Speaking at the event, Nick Koiza discusses the themes of our stand and his presentation titled, “Developing a strategy for maximising user benefits with critical mobile broadband solutions”. You can catch Nick delivering his talk on the second day of the exhibition (June 14th at 14:30).

Transcript

Hi, I’m Nick Koiza and I’d like to tell you about our plan for Plextek to exhibit at Mission Critical Technologies at the Excel in London on the 13-14th June so hopefully we’ll see you there.

Our plan for the show will be the secure critical communications market, a sector that’s currently transitioning from traditional PMR to embrace the latest in LTE technology. We’ve been addressing this market from several perspectives. Firstly, we’ve been focusing on our customer’s needs in developing next generation LTE devices to enable the users to benefit from broadband data. Secondly, we’ve been designing and supplying safe city IOT solutions, an area where many of our customers from across the globe have benefited from Plextek’s heritage in smart sensors as well as in communications.

Finally, our growth has been accelerated recently as a result of the work we have been doing on disruptive technologies for unmanned systems and automation. For example, we’ve been developing and integrating sensors for UAV platforms for detection and surveillance purposes. We see this area as being hugely significant to the public safety community, particularly with broadband data enabling the emergency services and counter-terrorism officers to gain rapid access to intelligence to enhance their decision-making.

So, we’ll be showcasing all of these areas on our stand, at Plextek stand number 210 and I’ll be speaking on the second day of the conference so we look forward to seeing you there.

Further Reading

Safe Cities: Combining Tech with Community Initiatives

Safe Cities: Combining Tech with Community Initiatives

Nicholas Koiza - Head of Business Development, Security

By: Nick Koiza
Head of Business, Security

18th April 2018

Home » Insights » Security

With the growth of cities around the globe and the corresponding rise in life-threatening crime, Governments have an increased responsibility to ensure the safety of their citizens, organisations and infrastructure. This also places greater emphasis on IoT eco-systems required to support civilisation, particularly as cities become more connected.

In order to ensure your City is a Safe City, there are key elements to consider:

Integrated system – a shared infrastructure with common sensors connected by a shared network – evolved from a disparate set of sensors with no interoperability.

Multi-Agency collaboration – Moving beyond shared infrastructure to sharing intelligence, operational procedures and planning. For example, in the event of a disaster how does communication work, who takes direction from whom.

Situational awareness – Real-time information, with high priority alerts, traffic data, sensor positions, resource locations, weather and other intelligence.

Video data & analytics – Information collated from an array of city sensors, watch-lists and other databases combined with video analytics, LPR, face recognition, behavioural analysis etc.

Automated processes – all relevant camera and other sensor information displayed on a single screen, with meaningful alerts and the generation of appropriate operational procedures to act on etc.

(source: https://www.ifsecglobal.com/safe-cities/)


In addition to the technology to support safe connected systems, communities need to be vigilant to look out for terrorism threats and the UK Counter Terrorism Police have just launched their four-week campaign to highlight what communities should do to if they suspect an attack. The public already contribute intelligence to around a third of the most serious terrorism investigations, but with educated communities, this will rise.

The threat is becoming more varied and the move towards low-tech attacks on crowded places, like those we have seen in major European cities and beyond, makes it even more important everyone remains vigilant and acts, by calling us confidentially, if they are concerned about suspicious activity.” – Mark Rowley, National Counter Terrorism Policing Lead


At Plextek we have been developing solutions to combat threats with advanced sensors and communication systems. With cities adopting great technology and enabling their habitants to alert the authorities easier than ever before, we are setting the foundations for a more secure future.

I believe the numerous IoT-based safe city solutions out there in the marketplace have enabled customers to effectively combat wide-ranging threats. For example, Plextek have developed a leading edge smart street lighting system for increasing public safety which is now widely deployed and has helped to reduce crime and improve driving conditions.

If you’d like to discuss safe cities or technology developments in the security sector, then contact me through security@plextek.com.

With the growth of cities around the globe and the corresponding rise in life-threatening crime, Governments have an increased responsibility to ensure the safety of their citizens, organisations and infrastructure. This also places greater emphasis on IoT eco-systems required to support civilisation, particularly as cities become more connected.

In order to ensure your City is a Safe City, there are key elements to consider:

Integrated system – a shared infrastructure with common sensors connected by a shared network – evolved from a disparate set of sensors with no interoperability.

Multi-Agency collaboration – Moving beyond shared infrastructure to sharing intelligence, operational procedures and planning. For example, in the event of a disaster how does communication work, who takes direction from whom.

Situational awareness – Real-time information, with high priority alerts, traffic data, sensor positions, resource locations, weather and other intelligence.

Video data & analytics – Information collated from an array of city sensors, watch-lists and other databases combined with video analytics, LPR, face recognition, behavioural analysis etc.

Automated processes – all relevant camera and other sensor information displayed on a single screen, with meaningful alerts and the generation of appropriate operational procedures to act on etc.

(source: https://www.ifsecglobal.com/safe-cities/)


In addition to the technology to support safe connected systems, communities need to be vigilant to look out for terrorism threats and the UK Counter Terrorism Police have just launched their four-week campaign to highlight what communities should do to if they suspect an attack. The public already contribute intelligence to around a third of the most serious terrorism investigations, but with educated communities, this will rise.

The threat is becoming more varied and the move towards low-tech attacks on crowded places, like those we have seen in major European cities and beyond, makes it even more important everyone remains vigilant and acts, by calling us confidentially, if they are concerned about suspicious activity.” – Mark Rowley, National Counter Terrorism Policing Lead


At Plextek we have been developing solutions to combat threats with advanced sensors and communication systems. With cities adopting great technology and enabling their habitants to alert the authorities easier than ever before, we are setting the foundations for a more secure future.

I believe the numerous IoT-based safe city solutions out there in the marketplace have enabled customers to effectively combat wide-ranging threats. For example, Plextek have developed a leading edge smart street lighting system for increasing public safety which is now widely deployed and has helped to reduce crime and improve driving conditions.

If you’d like to discuss safe cities or technology developments in the security sector, then contact me through security@plextek.com.

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Further Reading