Making a LiDAR – Part 4

Electronics Prototyping, and getting a graduate job at Plextek

By: David
Principal Consultant, Data Exploration

11th April 2019

3 minute read

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Electronics Prototyping, and getting a graduate job at Plextek

Since I first picked up a soldering iron I’d say there have been two significant changes in electronics; the parts have got smaller, and my eyesight has got worse. With the advent of surface mount, I did fear we were entering an educational dark age. It became beyond the scope of the hobbyist to create PCBs and solder the parts. Luckily, I think all that’s changed, and there has never been a better time for both commercial prototyping and hobbyist experimentation.

As I described in the previous blog, I’m very much a fan of the STM32 platform, and ST Microelectronics have produced some terrific prototyping boards. In fact, the same is true for every major player in the microcontroller market. All these boards have in common low cost and bring out fine pitch surface mount packages to user-friendly headers.

For around £10 I can visit RS components, and buy a very capable STM32 prototyping board with all of the microcontroller’s features our LIDAR will need. With the addition of a few breakout boards, we can test and prototype all the electronics for our LIDAR without ever having to touch a soldering iron or make a PCB.

We do still have one problem, and that’s because our initial prototype can end up a bit of a mess. All those prototype and breakout boards can leave a “rats nest” of wires, it’s fragile, and it’s probably too big. Luckily, rapid and low-cost PCB production has also come a long way. We’ll take advantage of this for our LIDAR electronics.

A quick visit to one of the far Eastern PCB prototyping houses shows I can get 10 copies of a small custom two-layer PCB for $5 plus shipping. Pushing to 4 layers and it’s only $49 plus shipping. I really have no idea how they make it commercially viable! If you’re concerned about quality and security, a European PCB house isn’t that much more expensive. Of course, you still have to design and solder the PCB, but with a copy of Eagle, a visit to YouTube, a low-cost USB microscope, and a rework gun, you’d be surprised how easy it is. Surface tension is your friend!

So what’s my message from this Blog? Well, over the years I’ve become more and more involved with graduate recruitment, and it’s often a long and frustrating process. I’ve become very impressed by the extent of knowledge and understanding our young potential recruits have, but they generally are not so confident about demonstrating these abilities. So, if you’re keen on a career in embedded electronics, then my challenge to you is to get yourself noticed. Buy yourself some prototyping boards, build some embedded projects, and look on the internet to find out how to do it. Bring them with you to your interview, and show us what you’ve done. I promise if you do that, you will stand head and shoulders above the crowd.

Since I first picked up a soldering iron I’d say there have been two significant changes in electronics; the parts have got smaller, and my eyesight has got worse. With the advent of surface mount, I did fear we were entering an educational dark age. It became beyond the scope of the hobbyist to create PCBs and solder the parts. Luckily, I think all that’s changed, and there has never been a better time for both commercial prototyping and hobbyist experimentation.

As I described in the previous blog, I’m very much a fan of the STM32 platform, and ST Microelectronics have produced some terrific prototyping boards. In fact, the same is true for every major player in the microcontroller market. All these boards have in common low cost and bring out fine pitch surface mount packages to user-friendly headers.

For around £10 I can visit RS components, and buy a very capable STM32 prototyping board with all of the microcontroller’s features our LIDAR will need. With the addition of a few breakout boards, we can test and prototype all the electronics for our LIDAR without ever having to touch a soldering iron or make a PCB.

We do still have one problem, and that’s because our initial prototype can end up a bit of a mess. All those prototype and breakout boards can leave a “rats nest” of wires, it’s fragile, and it’s probably too big. Luckily, rapid and low-cost PCB production has also come a long way. We’ll take advantage of this for our LIDAR electronics.

A quick visit to one of the far Eastern PCB prototyping houses shows I can get 10 copies of a small custom two-layer PCB for $5 plus shipping. Pushing to 4 layers and it’s only $49 plus shipping. I really have no idea how they make it commercially viable! If you’re concerned about quality and security, a European PCB house isn’t that much more expensive. Of course, you still have to design and solder the PCB, but with a copy of Eagle, a visit to YouTube, a low-cost USB microscope, and a rework gun, you’d be surprised how easy it is. Surface tension is your friend!

So what’s my message from this Blog? Well, over the years I’ve become more and more involved with graduate recruitment, and it’s often a long and frustrating process. I’ve become very impressed by the extent of knowledge and understanding our young potential recruits have, but they generally are not so confident about demonstrating these abilities. So, if you’re keen on a career in embedded electronics, then my challenge to you is to get yourself noticed. Buy yourself some prototyping boards, build some embedded projects, and look on the internet to find out how to do it. Bring them with you to your interview, and show us what you’ve done. I promise if you do that, you will stand head and shoulders above the crowd.

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