Visualising Ideas

By: Nick Burman
Graphic Designer

25th July 2018

Home » Graphic Design

Songwriters, architects, chefs and engineers have at least one thing in common.

They all need ideas.

There are as many (if not more) sources of ideas as there are individuals, and the process of developing those ideas can be lengthy and involved, or instantaneous and effortless. But often it is necessary to communicate ideas to others to develop them further, explore them deeper or involve others to bring the ideas to fruition.

Ever since Alex Steinweiss created the first album cover in 1939, musicians have depended on visuals to help sell their music. Architects use illustrative renderings to show how a building will look, and chefs even find the need to pictorialise their recipes. Not only do people eat with their eyes first, we also (arguably) trust and retain visual information more.

From a business perspective, turning ideas into visuals is a vital step in developing ideas and engaging other people such as investors, clients or work colleagues. You could write an entire report with text, but since 65% of people are visual learners, you would be reaching less than half of your audience.

Two effective methods for transmitting ideas are photography and illustration.


Photography

Photography works well at portraying the visible. It might be in situ, in a clean environment like a seemless background or mocked up in an ideal surrounding. Using plain backgrounds and a well lit subject helps to remove distractions from the point – the subject of the photograph.

Visualising ideas, photography, medical application


Illustration

Illustration aids the portrayal of ideas and subjects that may not currently exist (or only exist in part) in the real world. Filling in the gaps photography simply can’t capture in front of a lens, such as computer generated imagery for backgrounds and other elements within an illustrated image.

In the medical field for example, there are lots of cases where illustration is the only way to present an idea or concept working as intended in a real-world environment, due to stringent regulations and other market specific pressures en route to productisation.

illustration, infographic, visualising ideas

In a technical environment, accuracy has to be key. To this end, a workflow that includes a number of rounds of revisions helps to make sure the illustration or photograph communicate to the client what they want to see.

Also important are the aesthetic points, or what could be considered the discretionary aspects. Colour choices, font usage, spacing and style.


Colour

The right colour palette allows the important aspects of an illustration to be prominent while conveying the right mood (and certainly avoiding the wrong one).Colours are an instant way to create mood and evoke an emotional response. Since a vast proportion of buying decisions are emotional, colour has a very important role to play in visualising ideas. It might be tempting to use bright bold colours for anything that is meant to stand out, but if the overall scheme is jarring, you can easily turn people away.


Type

The correct font can be more subliminal. With longer piece of copy (like the one you’re reading) the right line spacing (leading) and letter spacing (tracking and kerning) can make the copy easier to read and guide the eye from line to line and word to word. Sentence structure and even line length can have an effect, and tire the reader quickly causing them to lose interest in what they are reading.

With short copy, and text that accompanies images, the right font also has the power to convey the right mood. The right font can imply power, style, excitement or nostalgia, and the wrong one can make even an international corporation look like a corner shop.

visualising ideas, font choice, graphic design

While we know that images help break up text – especially in lengthy Powerpoint presentations – knowing how to present ideas and communicate them effectively with the audience in mind can be key to a project’s success, even if you’re not Richard Rodgers.

 


1image source: http://www.vulture.com/2011/09/steinweiss/slideshow/

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Songwriters, architects, chefs and engineers have at least one thing in common.

They all need ideas.

There are as many (if not more) sources of ideas as there are individuals, and the process of developing those ideas can be lengthy and involved, or instantaneous and effortless. But often it is necessary to communicate ideas to others to develop them further, explore them deeper or involve others to bring the ideas to fruition.

Ever since Alex Steinweiss created the first album cover in 1939, musicians have depended on visuals to help sell their music. Architects use illustrative renderings to show how a building will look, and chefs even find the need to pictorialise their recipes. Not only do people eat with their eyes first, we also (arguably) trust and retain visual information more.

From a business perspective, turning ideas into visuals is a vital step in developing ideas and engaging other people such as investors, clients or work colleagues. You could write an entire report with text, but since 65% of people are visual learners, you would be reaching less than half of your audience.

Two effective methods for transmitting ideas are photography and illustration.

Photography

Photography works well at portraying the visible. It might be in situ, in a clean environment like a seemless background or mocked up in an ideal surrounding. Using plain backgrounds and a well lit subject helps to remove distractions from the point – the subject of the photograph.

Visualising ideas, photography, medical application

Illustration

Illustration aids the portrayal of ideas and subjects that may not currently exist (or only exist in part) in the real world. Filling in the gaps photography simply can’t capture in front of a lens, such as computer generated imagery for backgrounds and other elements within an illustrated image.

In the medical field for example, there are lots of cases where illustration is the only way to present an idea or concept working as intended in a real-world environment, due to stringent regulations and other market specific pressures en route to productisation.

illustration, infographic, visualising ideas

In a technical environment, accuracy has to be key. To this end, a workflow that includes a number of rounds of revisions helps to make sure the illustration or photograph communicate to the client what they want to see.

Also important are the aesthetic points, or what could be considered the discretionary aspects. Colour choices, font usage, spacing and style.

Colour

The right colour palette allows the important aspects of an illustration to be prominent while conveying the right mood (and certainly avoiding the wrong one).Colours are an instant way to create mood and evoke an emotional response. Since a vast proportion of buying decisions are emotional, colour has a very important role to play in visualising ideas. It might be tempting to use bright bold colours for anything that is meant to stand out, but if the overall scheme is jarring, you can easily turn people away.

Type

The correct font can be more subliminal. With longer piece of copy (like the one you’re reading) the right line spacing (leading) and letter spacing (tracking and kerning) can make the copy easier to read and guide the eye from line to line and word to word. Sentence structure and even line length can have an effect, and tire the reader quickly causing them to lose interest in what they are reading.

With short copy, and text that accompanies images, the right font also has the power to convey the right mood. The right font can imply power, style, excitement or nostalgia, and the wrong one can make even an international corporation look like a corner shop.

visualising ideas, font choice, graphic design

While we know that images help break up text – especially in lengthy Powerpoint presentations – knowing how to present ideas and communicate them effectively with the audience in mind can be key to a project’s success, even if you’re not Richard Rodgers.

 


1image source: http://www.vulture.com/2011/09/steinweiss/slideshow/

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save