50 ways to leave your lover

50 Ways to Leave Your Lover…. And to Solve a Problem

Stephen Field - Lead Consultant, Product Design

By: Stephen Field
Lead Consultant, Product Design

15th November 2017

Home » brainstorming

There are ‘50 Ways to Leave Your Lover’ according to singer Paul Simon in his hit song from 1975. Looking back, he only managed to recommend five, quite vague, ways of extricating yourself from a physical relationship. I suppose you’d call that false advertising, or perhaps, over-promising and under-delivering.

Of course, Paul is only tapping into his own personal experiences and knowledge. There are likely more than fifty ways to leave one’s lover and, with no pretence of a subtle transition, I move on to compare the themes of this song to the role of the engineering designer.

In terms of mechanical design, there are usually many ways to solve a design problem. In fact, you’ll be able to find parallels here that relate to any design or engineering specialism. While there are numerous solutions to a problem, no one person, no matter how clever or experienced, can have sufficient insight to see all the possible approaches. Each of us has a limitation on what training and experience we have received and what life has exposed us to. This knowledge informs how we react to design challenges; how we approach them and the courses of action we inherently pursue.

Collaboratively, we can accomplish so much more. The adage ‘two heads are better than one’ is completely true in this scenario. Working together to solve problems enables a much wider experience to fertilise the problem-solving egg. When done at the right time, this can be amplified by the use of brainstorming techniques.

Brainstorming is most effective when the team is comprised of a diverse range of backgrounds. An individual’s engineering experiences ensures each member brings something unique to the creative process and we’re able to visualise many possible solutions as a result. Brainstorming helps us avoid simply opting for the first solution that comes to mind, which may not be the best. Furthermore, working in a team also helps the creative process. One idea sparks another, and so on.

A diverse team with an open dialogue approach to the creative process allows for the introduction of different ways of seeing the world and the challenges we face. These varied viewpoints help to steer the design to the best solution. The person who can see the holes in another’s plan has just as an important contribution as the one making the suggestion.

The moral of the story; during the creative phase of the design process – share and collaborate with your colleagues. Almost certainly they will have a perspective you’ve not seen. When faced with a mental block over your design, share and welcome different and even opposing views from a supportive team. Make a new plan, Stan.

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There are ‘50 Ways to Leave Your Lover’ according to singer Paul Simon in his hit song from 1975. Looking back, he only managed to recommend five, quite vague, ways of extricating yourself from a physical relationship. I suppose you’d call that false advertising, or perhaps, over-promising and under-delivering.

Of course, Paul is only tapping into his own personal experiences and knowledge. There are likely more than fifty ways to leave one’s lover and, with no pretence of a subtle transition, I move on to compare the themes of this song to the role of the engineering designer.

In terms of mechanical design, there are usually many ways to solve a design problem. In fact, you’ll be able to find parallels here that relate to any design or engineering specialism. While there are numerous solutions to a problem, no one person, no matter how clever or experienced, can have sufficient insight to see all the possible approaches. Each of us has a limitation on what training and experience we have received and what life has exposed us to. This knowledge informs how we react to design challenges; how we approach them and the courses of action we inherently pursue.

Collaboratively, we can accomplish so much more. The adage ‘two heads are better than one’ is completely true in this scenario. Working together to solve problems enables a much wider experience to fertilise the problem-solving egg. When done at the right time, this can be amplified by the use of brainstorming techniques.

Brainstorming is most effective when the team is comprised of a diverse range of backgrounds. An individual’s engineering experiences ensures each member brings something unique to the creative process and we’re able to visualise many possible solutions as a result. Brainstorming helps us avoid simply opting for the first solution that comes to mind, which may not be the best. Furthermore, working in a team also helps the creative process. One idea sparks another, and so on.

A diverse team with an open dialogue approach to the creative process allows for the introduction of different ways of seeing the world and the challenges we face. These varied viewpoints help to steer the design to the best solution. The person who can see the holes in another’s plan has just as an important contribution as the one making the suggestion.

The moral of the story; during the creative phase of the design process – share and collaborate with your colleagues. Almost certainly they will have a perspective you’ve not seen. When faced with a mental block over your design, share and welcome different and even opposing views from a supportive team. Make a new plan, Stan.

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