Virtual Reality: What’s Science Fiction and Science Fact?

Virtual Reality: What’s Science Fiction and Science Fact?

Chris Lancaster - Graduate Software Engineer

By: Chris Lancaster
Graduate Software Engineer

7th June 2017

Home » Virtual Reality

When the term ‘Virtual Reality (VR)’ is brought up, it instantly conjures the picture of a person being placed inside a Computer Generated Image (CGI) environment and them interacting with their newly simulated surroundings. Science fiction has used the concept numerous times to craft this far-fetched idea of what technology can do, but is it really beyond our grasp?

Like all technology, it goes through a lifecycle. At first, some new discovery is made and it seems like it could solve all the world’s problems. As news of such a discovery spreads, expectations grow beyond what is currently possible. In the ‘Technology Hype Cycle’, when expectations are at their highest, it is known as the ‘Peak of Inflated Expectations’. This peak then falls away as people move on with their lives, but that doesn’t mean the technology fades as well.

In fact, it can be quite the opposite, as it is being continually developed and refined over and over again, each time creating new possibilities and applications. Over time, more realistic expectations begin to grow. That’s where virtual reality now sits, on the ‘Slope of Enlightenment’, ready to be put to use in the real world.

The problem isn’t technology, the technology is already here. A simple mobile phone is powerful enough to be able to render an environment in which we can look around and move. Google Cardboard is a cheap way of allowing anyone to take advantage of the power in their pockets. Simply place your phone in the cardboard case and use the Google Cardboard app to render an environment.  On the other end of the scale, there are more complex headsets, such as HTC’s Vive, which not only gives the user the visual experience but allows them to interact with objects in the VR world through the use of controllers.

So if it’s that easy to experience VR, why doesn’t everyone use it?

We have the technology, what we’re lacking is content which the technology can use. It’s a problem that will be solved with time, once content creators understand what can be done with such technology. Currently, the leading market for VR is gaming but what if it could be used for training purposes?

Time Shift Reality

If VR is a CGI environment, then ‘time shift reality’ is the idea of placing someone in another part of the world and in a different time through 360˚ videos /pictures. What you see does actually exist and you can experience it from the comfort of your own home. Take this video for example:

Save

Save

Footage owned by DiscoveryVR

I can take a gondola ride through Venice and choose where I want to look as if I was actually there. While this example is one of the more relaxing VR experiences, the educational implications are staggering.

Medical Realities is a VR/AR company specialising in medical training videos that puts the viewer inside the operating theatre, overseeing an operation through the eyes of the consultant surgeon. Placing someone within such a procedure is an invaluable experience, yet now it can be re-lived again and again. Each time a different focus can be taken, giving any medical student a complete overview of the inner workings of an operating theatre.

A different industry is real estate, Matterport is a company that builds 3D reconstructions of buildings – creating a “dollhouse” which a user can tour and move around in. It is not a virtual tour, as in a slideshow of images, but one which can be moved through and looked at from multiple different angles. Think Google Street View but for a house. This lets retailers show off their houses to a wider audience and give them the same experience as if they were actually there.

VR is on the up and up, with a prediction that the virtual reality market will be worth $120 billion by 2020. It is certainly an area that you should keep your eye on.

Apple has been doing so with their latest iPhone 7 Plus. Their newest device has a dual rear-facing camera setup. I can only speculate that there isn’t really any need for two cameras unless you want to be able to detect depth – a key requirement for augmented reality (AR).

This combined with the fact that Apple bought leading AR company, Metaio, in 2015 suggests that they’re looking to move into the VR/AR market in the near future. Metaio has also been suspiciously quiet on what they have been working on recently.

VR’s potential is large and far-reaching. Once the content issue is solved, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it in classrooms and homes, in much the same way we already have computers in most aspects of our lives. So maybe one day we can all have our own Star Trek Holodeck.

Save

Save

Save

Save

When the term ‘Virtual Reality (VR)’ is brought up, it instantly conjures the picture of a person being placed inside a Computer Generated Image (CGI) environment and them interacting with their newly simulated surroundings. Science fiction has used the concept numerous times to craft this far-fetched idea of what technology can do, but is it really beyond our grasp?

Like all technology, it goes through a lifecycle. At first, some new discovery is made and it seems like it could solve all the world’s problems. As news of such a discovery spreads, expectations grow beyond what is currently possible. In the ‘Technology Hype Cycle’, when expectations are at their highest, it is known as the ‘Peak of Inflated Expectations’. This peak then falls away as people move on with their lives, but that doesn’t mean the technology fades as well.

In fact, it can be quite the opposite, as it is being continually developed and refined over and over again, each time creating new possibilities and applications. Over time, more realistic expectations begin to grow. That’s where virtual reality now sits, on the ‘Slope of Enlightenment’, ready to be put to use in the real world.

The problem isn’t technology, the technology is already here. A simple mobile phone is powerful enough to be able to render an environment in which we can look around and move. Google Cardboard is a cheap way of allowing anyone to take advantage of the power in their pockets. Simply place your phone in the cardboard case and use the Google Cardboard app to render an environment.  On the other end of the scale, there are more complex headsets, such as HTC’s Vive, which not only gives the user the visual experience but allows them to interact with objects in the VR world through the use of controllers.

So if it’s that easy to experience VR, why doesn’t everyone use it?

We have the technology, what we’re lacking is content which the technology can use. It’s a problem that will be solved with time, once content creators understand what can be done with such technology. Currently, the leading market for VR is gaming but what if it could be used for training purposes?

Time Shift Reality

If VR is a CGI environment, then ‘time shift reality’ is the idea of placing someone in another part of the world and in a different time through 360˚ videos /pictures. What you see does actually exist and you can experience it from the comfort of your own home. Take this video for example:

Save

Save

Save

Footage owned by DiscoveryVR

I can take a gondola ride through Venice and choose where I want to look as if I was actually there. While this example is one of the more relaxing VR experiences, the educational implications are staggering.

Medical Realities is a VR/AR company specialising in medical training videos that puts the viewer inside the operating theatre, overseeing an operation through the eyes of the consultant surgeon. Placing someone within such a procedure is an invaluable experience, yet now it can be re-lived again and again. Each time a different focus can be taken, giving any medical student a complete overview of the inner workings of an operating theatre.

A different industry is real estate, Matterport is a company that builds 3D reconstructions of buildings – creating a “dollhouse” which a user can tour and move around in. It is not a virtual tour, as in a slideshow of images, but one which can be moved through and looked at from multiple different angles. Think Google Street View but for a house. This lets retailers show off their houses to a wider audience and give them the same experience as if they were actually there.

VR is on the up and up, with a prediction that the virtual reality market will be worth $120 billion by 2020. It is certainly an area that you should keep your eye on.

Apple has been doing so with their latest iPhone 7 Plus. Their newest device has a dual rear-facing camera setup. I can only speculate that there isn’t really any need for two cameras unless you want to be able to detect depth – a key requirement for augmented reality (AR).

This combined with the fact that Apple bought leading AR company, Metaio, in 2015 suggests that they’re looking to move into the VR/AR market in the near future. Metaio has also been suspiciously quiet on what they have been working on recently.

VR’s potential is large and far-reaching. Once the content issue is solved, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it in classrooms and homes, in much the same way we already have computers in most aspects of our lives. So maybe one day we can all have our own Star Trek Holodeck.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The development of virtual and augmented reality technology has taken a surge forward recently with the release of hardware that finally allows it to live up to its promise. Beyond gaming and enjoyment, the applications for this technology are wide and far-reaching and will change the face of learning and training in many sectors.

Plextek features on Defence Online website.

To read the full article click here.

Cambridge, UK – 24th November 2016 – Design and innovation consultancy, Plextek announces the successful completion of a proof of concept project with the UK government’s Centre of Defence Enterprise (CDE) to create a brand new immersive skills training and development solution for trainee tank drivers and pilots using the virtual reality headset the Oculus Rift.

The flexible system, run through a simple commercially-available laptop and the Oculus Rift headset, offers potential tank drivers the chance to test and hone vital skills such as hand-to-eye coordination, reading maps and 3D displays and teamwork. Once wearing the headset, the user navigates themselves through different landscapes, carrying out different tasks such as matching colours and shapes while simultaneously balancing items using their controllers. Other team members can join them inside the system with additional headsets to enable team collaboration exercises that ordinary ‘immersive’ solutions cannot provide.

With a traditional simulation training system costing around £20 million for a professional full motion simulator (or £575 for an hour rental), this alternative VR-based solution is also incredibly flexible, portable and saving several millions of pounds for the Ministry of Defence (MoD) to implement across the tri-services, providing a cost effective yet unique approach to training in the defence industry.

Plextek’s VR system will also help the MoD to screen the innate abilities of groups of candidates at the start of the recruitment process and use the results to guide individuals towards specific career paths where they have shown a natural talent. This will help optimise the overall time and cost of training by filtering out weaker candidates, who are a drain on resources, earlier in the process.

The current system will continue to be developed by Plextek with plans to expand beyond tank drivers to introduce a variety of other job functions across the tri-services.

Collette Johnson, Director of Medical & Healthcare at Plextek: “Virtual reality is revolutionising the quality and accuracy of training programmes for the military, providing the chance for military personnel to not only understand the skills they are proficient in, but where they must learn and develop further. This new government-funded technology solution showcases the innovation the defence market is currently experiencing and how, in the future, we will see many more examples of ‘consumer’ technology being integrated more specialist military applications.”

Tim Vaughan, Capability Development – UK Defence Solutions Centre: “Having won the Phase 1 Innovation Challenge, Plextek developed their innovative Virtual Reality skills evaluation system that can be used to assess the early suitability of new recruits, new employees and people undergoing new training challenges. It has potential to cut through the sometimes haphazard people evaluation process, to draw out strong candidates and thereby shorten the selection and training process.”

Notes to editors

Central to its culture is the company’s ability to innovate, taking an idea from concept to market. For more than 25 years the team of consultants, engineers and project managers has turned our clients’ business opportunities into commercial success, designing, manufacturing and supplying leading-edge products. Supported by our network of suppliers, commercial partners and research organisations, Plextek is the trusted partner of choice for more than 300 commercial clients, government agencies, and ambitious start-up companies.

For images, information or interview requests, please contact: Adam Roberts via email: press@plextek.com or call: 01799 533200